July Roundtable: The Special Relationship (Author and Reviewer)

What’s sizzling? Hope it isn’t your flesh and that all of you haven’t been bored without me. It’s close to the end of the month and you know what that means?

Roundtable Time!

Last month, I premiered part one, which talked about etiquette between authors. This time around, I shine my strobe light on authors and reviewers. So, here are the questions I presented:

1. Have you, as an author, ever done a review for a book—either at your leisure or as part of an organization? Is your approach different in serving one capacity as opposed to the other (if applicable)?

2. Have you ever received a review that was more critical than favorable? How did you handle the situation?

3. Overall, should an author ever contact a reviewer for any reason? Expand below.

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dakhartarisingnewlogoUsually I go last, but this time I will be the first to chime in. For the first question, I’ve done them more for leisure than anything and when I actually have time. I’d honestly rather invest the energy in writing my own stuff. To the second one, I did receive a one star for Vocal Remedy. I opted to stay silent on it. Every one is entitled to his or her opinion. For the last one, I think it is an absolute no-no, not even to extend a thank you. It’s respect enough for a person to even look at your work. That person could have easily said no or not taken the time to give his or her thoughts.

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queen.logo1

Hello, Queen here. I’d like to go next, if you don’t mind.

Have you, as an author, ever done a review for a book—either at your leisure or as part of an organization? Is your approach different in serving one capacity as opposed to the other (if applicable)?

I do review books under a professional capacity as well as for leisure. However, the ingredients to what makes a good book are still the same under both umbrellas

Have you ever received a review that was more critical than favorable? How did you handle the situation?

The only one was on Reflections of Soul, and the review wasn’t really that bad. It was a three star on Amazon. I did want to know a bit more in the form of improvement and he said he would provide a bit more detail in an updated review, but the updated review was never posted.

Overall, should an author ever contact a reviewer for any reason? Expand below.

On the reviewer side (in my professional capacity), I get all types. Some are genuinely thankful for the review while other authors will say they are thankful but the tone of the correspondences seem condescending. Those types of replies, if they don’t come from a genuine place, I’d rather the author stay mum.

The worst are the defensive types: the ones that act outraged when you are in the minority, the handful that cannot see how the book garnered four and five star reviews when I can only rate it as a two. You get deemed all types of things under the sun and some goes as far as to try to discredit the reviewer.

With that being said, overall, the author should NOT contact the reviewer, based on my own experiences.

Lately, even when the author has expressed gratitude, I don’t reply back. If the work is highly favorable, the author may get a reach out as it pertains to being part of the Author Spotlight, but that’s by selection more so than just my thoughts.

In addition, if an author is too combative with a reviewer over a critical review, it makes other people (on a personal and professional level) hesitant to review the author’s work. In that person’s mind, “If I don’t like his book, he’s going to give me just as hard of a time as the other person.”

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LogoDesireHello Awesome Visitors! It’s Desire, creeping into Da’Kharta’s spot to give my sixty nine cents, if you will.

Have you, as an author, ever done a review for a book—either at your leisure or as part of an organization? Is your approach different in serving one capacity as opposed to the other (if applicable)? 

Every time I contemplate doing reviews on a more frequent level, I hear so many horror stories from those who do this professionally. Therefore, I do it when I can and if I feel up to it. That does mean that days, even weeks may go by before I post a review on something I’ve read but it’s mostly so the material can fully soak.

Have you ever received a review that was more critical than favorable? How did you handle the situation?

As of this posting, can’t say that I have, although if I had to choose between a critical review and little to no reviews, I’d take the former. Reason being that maybe someone reading my work and expands on it can point out areas where I need to improve.

Overall, should an author ever contact a reviewer for any reason? Expand below.

Hmm … this is a tough one for me because I’ve been taught to thank someone whenever the person has done something for me. In the industry, however, most frown upon it. So I must admit this will be a hard author habit for me to break.

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ynewlogoCha’Lo! Y is in the building!

Have you, as an author, ever done a review for a book—either at your leisure or as part of an organization? Is your approach different in serving one capacity as opposed to the other (if applicable)? 

I have. I work as part of the team that composes The Review Board. However, I find that my approach to reviewing stands at part with my approach to writing. I have a rule of thumb when it comes to writing a book, that is this: I ask myself “Would I want to read this book?”

If the answer is yes, then I know that other reviewers might appreciate my work.

So, I say that to say this … I wouldn’t expect in a book anything that I could not deliver myself as a writer. So, I judge other books by the ruler with which I judge myself.

Have you ever received a review that was more critical than favorable? How did you handle the situation?

Yes, I sure have. Truthfully, I grinned and bared it. Why? Because I cannot sit there and judge other people’s works yet, not want anyone to say anything negative about my own. However, I also think that I’ve surpassed that petty train of thought. I’ve, long since, accepted that not everyone is going to love my work as much as I do.

Overall, should an author ever contact a reviewer for any reason? Expand below.

I really believe that they shouldn’t. We live in such a “delicate” time when it comes to books, authors and reviewers that any attempt to reach out to a reviewer (even if it’s with good intentions) could be misunderstood as a threat.

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rosenewlogoIs it too late to put my thorns in? Hi-Lo!

Have you, as an author, ever done a review for a book—either at your leisure or as part of an organization? Is your approach different in serving one capacity as opposed to the other (if applicable)? 

I have reviewed other peoples’ works. My overall approach is to see how entertaining or captivating the book is. I find that, as with Y, I look for the same things in books that I read that I would try to provide in my own works.

Have you ever received a review that was more critical than favorable? How did you handle the situation?

I have not had any bad reviews. Why, you ask? Because in my frame of mind, no review is bad. All, even the critical ones are good. Why, again? Because it teaches me things that I need to learn. If I’m not open to accepting critical reviews then I’m not ready to have my work on the market.

Overall, should an author ever contact a reviewer for any reason? Expand below.

I don’t think that we should reach out to people that leave bad reviews. I’m not certain if reaching out with a cordial “thank you” to those who leave good reviews is a bad thing. I would like to believe that it isn’t. But, shoot, I don’t really know. LOL

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adonismannnewlogoAre Mann invasions still welcomed? Allow me to indulge for a few minutes.

Have you, as an author, ever done a review for a book—either at your leisure or as part of an organization? Is your approach different in serving one capacity as opposed to the other (if applicable)?

I too have read and reviewed several books. In all truth, to measure a book one is reading by a different set of rules than one does not intend to practice in one’s own writing is an enormous injustice. It would be hypocritical of me to expect something out of a book that I’ve read and reviewed that I could not deliver myself.

Have you ever received a review that was more critical than favorable? How did you handle the situation?

I’ve yet to receive any bad reviews on my own works, thankfully. Yet, I find that if I ever should, I would still be thankful. For 2 reasons; one, the person took time out of their busy schedule to write a review on my work. Two, because I learn from everything. That is to say, if I were to obtain a negative review, I’m certain that there would be something that I could learn from said information.

Overall, should an author ever contact a reviewer for any reason? Expand below.

I believe that reviews, while written for authors, are more so directed to the reading audience. So, whatever feedback is given of a book is for the potential reader to read and then decide whether or not said book is for him/her. With that mentality, I would say that it would be bad sport to reach out to reviewers, as they aren’t leaving a review for you, per say, but for the future reader.

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Fist pound to everyone who chimed in on this month’s round table  Have a round table idea you want to share or you’d like to participate? Reply to the post below or hit me up at (my name) at allauthorspp dot net.

DR

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